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Home >> Medical Procedures >> X-Ray Examinations

 

X-Ray Examinations

An x-ray test is used to make images of your inner organs or bones to help diagnose conditions or diseases. A special machine emits (puts out) a small amount of ionizing radiation. This radiation pass through your body and falls on a film or similar device to produce the image.

The dose of radiation is roughly the same as you would receive from the general environment in about one week. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant. Another type of test may be recommended.

Who can perform x-rays?

Two health practitioners are involved in x-ray examinations:

  • A radiographer who conducts the examination
  • A radiologist (a medical specialist) who interprets x-ray images.

X-Ray Examination Procedure

Depending on the part of the body being examined, you may be asked to undress, remove all jewelers and wear a hospital gown. The basic procedure then involves:
  • A radiographer who conducts the examination
  • A radiologist (a medical specialist) who interprets x-ray images.
  • The radiographer may shield parts of your body with a lead apron. This is to reduce the risk of unnecessary exposure to radiation.
  • The radiographer operates the controls while each image is taken. To do this, they will stand behind a screen and call instructions to you if necessary.
  • You may be asked to hold your breath for a couple of seconds as each picture is taken, so that the breathing movement doesn't blur the images.
  • A straightforward and conventional x-ray examination of the hand, for example, usually takes a few minutes. Other types of x-ray examination may take longer.

Possible Complications

An x-ray test is a trouble-free and non-invasive process that doesn't reason any side effects. You will not be radioactive after the test. The dose of radiation is considered safe - roughly the same as you would receive from the general surroundings in about one week. Your increased risk of developing cancer within 10 years of the x-ray examination is negligible (very small) at less than 0.01 per cent.


 
 

 

 

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